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Barry

Our Infra-Red Album of Images

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Jeff.

 

Thank you for the compliment, Infra-Red it does open up something a little different doesn't it?

 

I was in that situation for quite some time and almost considered buying an old body to have converted, but after having used 20MP cameras now for so long I didn't want anything less than that. I am glad I waited, because the performance from a Canon 5D is very good.

 

If you have read my Pdf or seen my Presentation you will know how well it handles high contrast situations. I must admit that I wasn't aware of that in advance of having the camera converted and assumed the manipulation of Infra-Red would be tricky. In fact it isn't, far from it in fact

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Just stunning Barry.

I did just that I bought a second hand SLR camera from a friend and had it converted. I have another decision to make and need to ask your advise. 

Now I am settling down with my new Canon 5Dsr I'm thinking about having my 5D mark 11 converted to infra-red but with a different filter may 520 or 600, this will give some visual light.. Would I be right in saying this is where the lovely pastel colours show, then from these colours we can change them in the channel mixer. Also would I be able remove colour in  photoshop to get just black and white like my converted camera? If this is so I may sell my Canon 400D. 

Not in any hurry... just thinking. 

Doreen

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Doreen

I don't have any experience of a different filter, only what was explained to me by those who converted my Canon 5D. I think you have it right that with a lower range filter some visible light is allowed in and that will retain colour.

Dave Chilvers who has visited the forum in the past has had a number of cameras converted over the years and I seem to recall him saying that there is no exact science to this. They will all produce slightly different images and therefore results.

I did think about going down that road, because your right that you can always remove the colour and process as a black and white, but I wanted a good strong contrasty result

One thing that did go through my mind at the time is how the filter that allows some visible light in, does produce a very recognisable results. While it was nice to see sometimes, I am not sure I could live with it all the time and I was worried that it may affect the results I wanted in black and white

 

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Thank you Barry

Thinking of your images here.. would have to say a hint of colour may spoil them they are so stunning. Will need to have a good think.. it is £310.00 with postage to convert the the 5D.

You know what they say if in doubt do Knout.

 

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Doreen

I have two cameras converted to Infrared, the 720nm filter allows some visible light in and the colours are pastel and very beautiful. I also have a camera with an 830nm filter which allows in very little visible light and gives wonderful monochrome images with great tones from pure black to pure white. ( I believe Barry has this filter for his monochrome IR images)

Originally I had a 665nm filter, this allows in more visible light than the 720nm filter, but I found the colours much too garish for my taste, I thought I would just use the filter for monochrome images, but I finally changed to the 830nm filter because in my opinion the monochrome images from this filter are stunning.

Hope this is of some help.

 

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Donf

Yes, I think it does help and perhaps I could explain my approach when I started to consider having a camera converted to Infra-Red. This is a personal view of course. The coloured infra-red images that I saw posted on the internet were the product of allowing more visible light to mix with Infra-red (if that is the right way to explain this) and therefore the visible light that reaches the sensor records more colour.

Rightly or wrongly I saw those results as transient with little lasting appeal. I liked some of what I saw, but after a while I admit I grew a little tired of them. I hope that statement doesn't put off anyone here. Too many authors seemed to be producing the same coloured effect, a bit like using the same basic Photoshop filter. One we recognize instantly and because we know its easy to apply, it can lack lasting appeal and value.  

That is why I wanted to block as much visible light as I possibly could, because I felt that on those rare times when colour would add something to an infra-red shot, I could use Photoshop to add it. At all other times I was after the infra-red look I saw in my black and white film days using infra-red film. Finding a shop that sold black and white infra-red film was rare back then. The look I was after was high contrast monochrome and I am pleased that I can re-create that same effect, far easier with my converted camera, then I ever could with Infra-red film.

The one surprise to me when I started using the camera was how well infra-red handles high contrast situations, much better than visible light

_MG_7091 as Smart Object-1.jpg

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Barry,

As you say, the coloured infrared images are a matter of taste, I really dislike the over the top garish images that are plastered over the net and I am sure would be off putting to some people, I love the delicate colours from the 720nm filter and I never tire of them, As you point out using the 830nm filter is very tolerant of high contrast situations, the 720nm filter isn't so tolerant and can on occasions produce some unexpected unpleasant results, Also flare can be a problem even with a very good lens. Despite that you can get some wonderful results.

One big advantage for infrared users in my opinion, it extends the shooting day, Infrared is at it's best generally speaking when the sun is high in the sky and you don't really want to use your unconverted camera.

The beauty of a converted camera is you use it very much as your ordinary camera though to get the very best results I keep a close eye on the histogram and compensate as and when required.

 

Church yard 720nm filter.jpg

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I have found flare shows up sometimes when it wouldn't have with conventional light photography, but not to the level that I have found it an issue. Normally I can find a viewpoint that eliminates it, but some rare times, it adds something. I can shoot straight into the light and that seems to be fine

Some lenses cause a hot spot that is far more serious than any flare and there are some web sites that list the. I had to sell a Canon 16-35mm lens, because of the hotspot. Fortunately, I had one spare so I could keep one for my normal photography. I replaced it with a Canon 17-40mm and that is perfect, no hotspot as is the 24-105 and 28-135 canon lenses.

I agree whole heartedly that infra-red xstends the shooting day and when conventional shooting just won't deliver, infra red does.

The cemetery shot is a perfect example of the sort of contrast and sparkle that we are looking for and what most good infra red shots need is in fact something to contrast with the grass and leaves and th stones do that perfectly. It's a very nice shot

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We were told at the club the other week that the hot spots are caused mainly by the lens coatings they use now days, by reflections inside the camera from the sensor bouncing off the inner lens coating. I have noticed a similar thing when using an Infrared filter on the end of the lens on my Fujifilm X-T1.  

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I'm very pleased you like the church yard image, and you also mention the sparkle that you can get with infrared which can really make an image, I couldn't find the words to describe that special affect, but sparkle is a good description.

I had to discard a Sigma lens that had a terrible hot spot, I now use an 18 - 105mm Nikon lens which gives me crisp images without any hotspot.

I may be mistaken but in my experience infrared seems to be growing in popularity, I think it's a great part of the photography we all love, and will give great pleasure to those who try their hand at it.

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I have always used the term sparkle to describe that special something that makes any black and white stand out. Far too many mono shots are just colour images with the colour removed and they can look dull, muddy and lacking in contrast, or that B&W vital sparkle as I describe it.

A lens that creates a hot spot is a problem, but then they were not designed for infra red. My Canon showed the straight edges of the diaphram and were almost impossible to correct.

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donf

 

Thank you.. you have helped a great deal. Fantastic to hear from another infrared converted photographer:)

 

I like the pastel colours very much but I am edging towards the 830nm.. the monochome images with this filter are stunning and as Barry shows in his infrared tutorials colour can be added if we wish later. 

 

Your church yard shot is stunning and agree with Barry that the shot is a perfect example of contrast and sparkle we all would like to achieve. Thank you for posting.

 

I totally agree infrared users extend the the shooting day… what a great thought, on a warm bright summers day we can take photographs at any time and not wait for the golden hour…. best of both worlds I would say:rolleyes:.

 

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Doreen

Pleased you found my post useful. I don't think you will be disappointed if you decide to get the 830nm filter, I have posted below an image I took in December at Hastings using the 830nm filter, I think it demonstrates Barry's comment how well the filter handles contrast.

Whatever you decide I look forward to seeing some images from your converted camera, I wish you luck.56d9e1d8527b7_HastingsDec2015.thumb.jpg.

 

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donf

 

Thank you for posting.

 

Again I see the contrast and sparkle you have here.. the 830nm filter handles it well… not forgetting the photographers eye too. Will post soon.

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